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Correlative conjunctions grammar rules | Meaning & Examples

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Correlative conjunctions grammar rules | Meaning & Examples
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Correlative conjunctions grammar rules | Meaning & Examples

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Correlative Conjunctions: Correlative conjunctions grammar rules

Correlative Conjunctions:

Conjunction is the connection, the connection of any word or group of words or sentence is called Conjunction. It can be added to words, phrases or clauses.
Neither Rahim nor Karim works.

Correlative conjunctions are pairs of words that connect words, phrases, or clauses of equal grammatical rank. They are used to show various relationships between the elements they connect, such as choice, comparison, contrast, or emphasis.

Subject Verb Agreement

Definition of a Correlative Conjunction

A conjunction is a pair of words that work together to connect similar items in a sentence. They create a relationship between these items and give them equal importance.

For example, words like “either…or” or “not…not” are correlations. They connect words and phrases to help make our speech and writing stronger and clearer. So, the next time you want to express likes or connections, don’t forget to use reciprocal connections!

Correlative conjunctions meaning and examples

According to Collins Dictionary, correlative conjunctions consist of “two or more words that work together as a pair to connect two similar items.”

Word Of The Day Abdication

According to the Cambridge Dictionary, conjunctions are defined as words that are “used to describe two or more things in relation to each other”.

“Two related words are often used together but not usually next to each other. For example, ‘is’ and ‘or’,” says the Macmillan Dictionary.

According to the Grammarly, Correlative conjunctions are one of three types of conjunction.

There are 3 types of conjunctions :

  1. Coordinating Conjunction
  2. Subordinating Conjunction
  3. Correlatieve Conjunction

Here are the details and  examples of the correlative conjunctions you provided:

 

  1. Either/or:This conjunction is used to present two alternatives, one of which must be chosen.
  2. Railway Station Paragraph
  •  Example: You can either choose the red dress or the blue dress, but not both.
  1. Neither/nor:This conjunction is used to negate two alternatives, meaning that neither of them is true.
  •  Example: He neither enjoys reading nor watching movies.

 

  1. Both/and:This conjunction is used to connect two elements that are both true.
  •  Example: She is both intelligent and hardworking.
  1. Whether/or:This conjunction is used to introduce an alternative question.
  •  Example: I’m not sure whether I should go to the party or stay home.

 My Mother Paragraph for Class 5

  1. Would rather/than:This conjunction is used to express a preference for one alternative over another.
  •  Example: I would rather spend time with my family than go out with friends.
  1. Such/that:This conjunction is used to introduce a result clause that emphasizes the degree or extent of the first clause.
  •  Example: The weather was so bad that we had to cancel our trip.

 

  1. No sooner/than:This conjunction is used to express that one event happened immediately after another.
  •  Example: No sooner had I finished my work than the phone rang.
  1. Hardly/when:This conjunction is used to express that one event happened almost simultaneously with another.
  •  Example: Hardly had she sat down when the baby started crying.

 

  1. As/as:This conjunction is used to compare two things that are equal in some way.
  •  Example: The new car is as comfortable as the old one.
  1. As many/as:This conjunction is used to compare quantities.
  •  Example: There are as many stars in the sky as grains of sand on the beach.

 Gerund and infinitive examples

  1. As much/as:This conjunction is used to compare amounts.
  •  Example: She drinks as much coffee as I do.
  1. Not only/but also:This conjunction is used to connect two statements, the second of which adds information to the first.
  •  Example: Not only is she a talented singer, but she is also a skilled dancer.

 

 

Correlative ConjunctionStructureExample 1Example 2Example 3
Either/orEither A or BEither a nurse or a doctor will visit you in the morning.You can either go to the party or stay home.Would you like tea or coffee?
Neither/norNeither A nor BI have neither time nor patience to watch that boring film.He speaks neither English nor French.We saw neither the movie nor the play.
Both/andBoth A and BBoth her parents and her brother liked her boyfriend.I enjoy both reading and writing.We visited both the museum and the art gallery.
Whether/orWhether A or BI don’t know whether to cook something or to order takeaway.Whether you stay or go, it’s up to you.It’s uncertain whether she will come or not.
Would rather/thanWould rather A than BI would rather take a taxi than walk home in this weather.She would rather stay at home than go out.I would rather have tea than coffee.
Such/thatSuch A that BIt was such a small apartment that I didn’t have to work much to keep it neat and tidy.He was such a good friend that he always helped me when I needed it.The weather was so bad that we had to cancel our trip.
No sooner/thanNo sooner A than BNo sooner did we get out of the club than it started to rain.No sooner had I finished my work than the phone rang.No sooner did she arrive than she left again.
Hardly/whenHardly A when BHardly did Michael start eating when the phone rang.Hardly had she sat down when the baby started crying.Hardly had we arrived when we had to leave again.
As/asAs A as BToday will be as sunny as it was yesterday.He is as tall as his father.This book is as interesting as that one.
As many/asAs many A as BIn this school, we can take as many lessons as we like.There are as many stars in the sky as grains of sand on the beach.She has as many friends as I do.
As much/asAs much A as BDon’t hesitate to eat as much fruit salad as you like. It won’t make you fat.He drinks as much coffee as I do.She has as much money as she needs.
Not only/but alsoNot only A but also BBrenda was not only educated and intelligent but also pretty and well-mannered.He is not only a good student but also a talented athlete.The book is not only informative but also entertaining.

Example of correlative conjunctions

Below given the example of correlative conjunctions for your better understanding.

  1. Either/or:
  • You can either choose the red dress or the blue dress, but not both.
  • Either you join us for dinner, or we’ll go without you.
  • Either study hard or accept the consequences of failing the exam.
  1. Neither/nor:
  • He neither enjoys reading nor watching movies.
  • She speaks neither English nor French fluently.
  • Neither the book nor the movie lived up to my expectations.
  1. Both/and:
  • She is both intelligent and hardworking.
  • He is both a talented musician and a skilled athlete.
  • The house was both spacious and well-decorated.
  1. Whether/or:
  • I’m not sure whether I should go to the party or stay home.
  • Whether you believe it or not, the story is true.
  • It’s uncertain whether the train will arrive on time or be delayed.
  1. Would rather/than:
  • I would rather spend time with my family than go out with friends.
  • She would rather read a book than watch TV.
  • He would rather travel the world than settle down in one place.
  1. Such/that:
  • The weather was so bad that we had to cancel our trip.
  • The food was so delicious that we ate everything on our plates.
  • The movie was so boring that we fell asleep halfway through.
  1. No sooner/than:
  • No sooner had I finished my work than the phone rang.
  • No sooner did she arrive than she left again.
  • No sooner had we started the game than it began to rain.
  1. Hardly/when:
  • Hardly had she sat down when the baby started crying.
  • Hardly had I taken a bite of food when the power went out.
  • Hardly had we entered the room when the argument started.
  1. As/as:
  • The new car is as comfortable as the old one.
  • He is as tall as his father.
  • This book is as interesting as that one.
  1. As many/as:
  • There are as many stars in the sky as grains of sand on the beach.
  • She has as many friends as I do.
  • The city has as many museums as art galleries.
  1. As much/as:
  • She drinks as much coffee as I do.
  • He spends as much money on clothes as she does.
  • The dog eats as much food as the cat.
  1. Not only/but also:
  • Not only is she a talented singer, but she is also a skilled dancer.
  • He is not only a good student but also a responsible citizen.
  • The book is not only informative but also entertaining.

Reference :

 

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